My friend, Renee is at it again. Aren’t these way super cool book marks. She sent me some awesome photos of her kiddos work. I had to share with you all. Check out the YouTube video at the end for more details. Thanks, Renee for sharing these. I think they are amazing! Love how you always seem to integrate art in every lesson you teach in your curriculum. Much love to you for being Mary Frances’ 3rd grade teacher – mentor and advocate! 1969

I thought these were so cool on our Lower School bulletin board. Cathy Hicks did a fabulous job with her students and this mixed media lesson. They water colored the background with a crayon resist technique to add details.

She taught a lesson on cityscapes. The students had to draw them out using foam trays and create a template to make an edition of the print on different colors of papers.

Then they had to mount them to make them stand out. Creating a super layered effect. I saw them and just had to share them with you all!

Other blogs that have similar lesson plan ideas:

http://artroom104.blogspot.com.au/2013/04/2nd-grade-printmaking-unit-symmetrical.html?utm_source=feedly

http://beckermiddleart.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/architectural-printing-and-castle-value.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+7thAnd8thGradeArtAtBeckerMiddleSchool+(7th+and+8th+grade+ART+at+Becker+Middle+School)

http://laughpaintcreate.blogspot.com/2011/08/city-prints.html

Resources for Printmaking Techniques and Processes:

https://www.masterworksfineart.com/educational-resources/printmaking-techniques/

http://www.paceprints.com/techniques

http://www.artshow.com/resources/printmaking.html

Who invented printmaking?
The process is believed to have been invented by Daniel Hopfer (circa 1470-1536) of Augsburg, Germany, who decorated armor in this way, and applied the method to printmaking. Etching soon came to challenge engraving as the most popular printmaking medium.
When did printmaking begin?
The most common relief prints are woodcuts. Printmaking originated in China after paper was invented around AD 105. Relief printing appeared in Europe in the 15th Century, when the process of papermaking was imported from the East.
Thanks, Cassie for the cool lesson idea and Youtube tutorial!
https://cassiestephens.blogspot.com/2016/03/in-art-room-printed-cityscape-collages.html

Thanks Cathy for letting me share your kids art!
1969






Stik

                      

                  

Stik started painting unofficial, socially conscious murals in his hometown of Hackney, East London in 2001. His simple stick figures wordlessly tell the story of his community and he frequently collaborates with hospitals, charities and homeless organizations. Working from his East London studio, these projects are largely self-funded and he now creates monumental artworks with communities across the world.

    

Directions:

PUT YOUR NAME ON BACK OF YOUR PAPER

  • ·    Draw with a pencil a stick figure similar to Stik, the artist’s stick figure
  • ·    No mouth, hands, or feet
  • ·    Use 12×18 Colored Construction Paper. Paint the “Stik” figure white like his work.
  • ·    Outline your stick figure when it dries with a BLACK oil pastel / paint or Marker. Yes, you can use hair dryer to dry quicker.
  • ·    Put on drying rack
  • ·    Clean up paint
  • I lead with this lesson on Street Art and follow up with a Graffiti lesson using our Character Education words
  • http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/08/character-education-and-graffiti.html


Stencil Revolution » Artists » Stik Street Artist Biography

Stik Street Artist Biography

http://www.stencilrevolution.com/profiles/stik

“It’s the only thing in my life that I feel this strongly about.”

Stik makes for an odd figure in the world of street art. He creates cunningly simple lines and shapes that echo the nave drawings of children the world over. Yet the work is deceptively frank in appearance and meaning.

The artist’s painted community of stick men, women and children reside throughout London’s streetscape. Each location is carefully considered, and many are regularly revisited and maintained. These seemingly lost and forlorn figures could reflect Stik himself and his experience of homelessness. Perhaps it’s his way of making sure these characters have a home. He has stated, “My pieces are about moving through the cityscape and feeling insecure.”

The great unknown

What is known of Stik’s life would fill a very small piece of a very small wall. The English street artist was born in the mid-1980s. He claims to have always drawn, and that he found graffiti a natural evolution of his creativity. With no formal art education, he learned from other street artists, in particular Doze, Roa, Run and Zomby. Sightings of his signature stick figures in London began in 2002.

He maintains an anonymous persona, shielding his real self behind his image as a quiet and unassuming artist. There is, however, one biographical reference he emphasizes, and that is his period of homelessness. It’s a subject that his words often revisit, a theme that exists beneath the surface of his paintings.

Stik became homeless some time around the year 2000, the circumstances of which remain unexplained. He endured destitution for a period lasting approximately 10 years. He regularly relied on the generosity of friends for a place to stay, sofa-jumping day by day, but he also spent many nights in abandoned buildings. Stik lived through a lot of violence on the streets, and he recalls many times when he felt his life was in danger and he expected to die.

The winter of 2009 proved a turning point for Stik when a drop-in center helped him relocate to St. Mungo’s hostel in Hackney. His life at St. Mungo’s turned into a productive period for his street work. He acknowledges that the pursuit of art gave him the purpose and focus that pulled him of out homelessness.

Stik has kept a low profile as his recognition has increased, both for himself and his work (fans include Elton John, Bono and the Duke of Kent). He volunteers his time to art workshops and often gives back through donations of his work and time.

The artist originally used the name in reference to his drawn characters until people started to call him by it. After a while, the tag just seemed to “stick.”

The art of street art

“Art is free unless you’re selling it.”

Stik’s approach to public spaces is careful and considered. His view is to fit in with the immediate architecture and location, and he’ll never bomb a street or community ” he professes no interest in owning a street. Part of his work ethic includes returning to every painting as often as he can in order to clean it up from dirt and tagging. On more than one occasion, he’s said that he spends more time cleaning graffiti from his graffiti than he does making graffiti.

Stik’s beliefs concerning the nature of graffiti and art reflect a traditional, romantic ideology of the street. “Artistic statements should be free from censorship,” he says. “Sometimes you have to justify a price tag, but you shouldn’t have to justify art itself.”

Stik hasn’t exactly termed contemporary advertising a plague, but he’s by no means a fan. It’s a multi-faceted issue for him, revolving around ideas of art and commercialism. He considers it a matter of rights, a matter of who owns the streets. Balled up in the midst of the debate, he thinks graffiti is essential to urban life. He has talked about graffiti being less about breaking laws and more about changing laws.

“Street art is really an important medium because it’s completely uncensored. It’s an environmental medium. Actually, you are using your environment. You are using the city as your medium. The street art scene is dialogue. It’s more than dialogue; it’s a whole forum for a discussion. And it has feedback. It’s the blueprint that social networking was based on ” writing on your wall.”

About those stick figures

“I’ve been drawing these characters forever.”

Stik quietly confronts his audience with the most unassuming imagery possible. The heads are round. The eyes are dots. Bodies are rectangles and simple lines become arms, hands and legs. An arc here, a lean there, a chosen curve of a line ” this is all he relies upon to convey emotion. “Body language is really like a direct language,” Stik observes. “Transitioning that to lines on a page or on a wall strikes directly to your heart.”

But they’re not merely stick figures. As Stik explains, his characters become a type of emotional shorthand to reflect how he feels. They’re silent and therefore have no mouths, and are meant only to observe. Part of Stik’s artistic principle is a conscious response to work that proclaims “look at me” ” he wants to create art that looks at back its audience.

Stik’s work appears at times so spare and bleak that its character and posture seems to convey a sense of questioning or longing, sometimes even despair. “A lot of my work is loaded with a kind of melancholy,” he admits, “but I do try to put a positive or a light bit of gravitas in it so people can actually relate to it and it feels like something human.”

Stik smiles whenever he talks about his graffiti pulling him out of his homeless nightmare. He’s obviously proud of his accomplishments, and at the same time humbled by the attention and his success. Nonetheless, one question commonly comes at him time and again: how long can you keep doing these characters?

“I think,” Stik grins widely, “there’s enough diversity in stick figures to keep me happy for another 10 years.”
Other Links About Stik:
https://blog.vandalog.com/2013/12/stiks-first-nyc-solo-exhibit-at-dorian-grey-gallery/ 
http://stik.org/ 
https://www.artsy.net/artist/stik 
https://www.forbes.com/sites/alinacohen/2016/06/03/meet-the-artist-behind-the-famous-stick-figures/#40b1c10d795b 
 
Thanks for dropping by…1969
When you have a best teacher friend that follows your blog and gets inspired to do some of the ideas in her own classroom….ahhhh that is quite a good feeling! This was one of those post that my friend, Renee, chose to use as a tool in her classroom too. I think her kiddos did a great job. They thought Kristina Kuzmic’s video was on point! Crazy how something so simple can be that powerful.
My daughter had Renee as a 3rd grade teacher. She was just awesome. She had her pulse on many items in her classroom. The kids flourished in that environment. You see Renee is that teacher that is still teaching my daughter. They had a special connection and as we were applying to college and getting all of that jazz lined up…who was there to proof our college essay? Yes, Renee! (and, Jeff too)
2 weeks ago I wrote a post on this topic. I contacted Kristina via Facebook. She shared our post on her Facebook page. Do you know how many of you have visited that particular blog post? Guess… Well, as I am typing we are at 13,200! Yes, in a 2 week span. Can you believe that? Here is the link below:
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/you-are-bbq-sauce.html 
I think with that much traffic coming our way on this blog that it must mean that their is a need to discuss topics like bullying, mean girls and character education. What do you think? Well, Renee does a great job on integrating art into all of her lessons. It is such a smooth transition that the kids don’t have any idea they are learning. They think they are having fun. Now, if you can pull that off in the classroom in this day in time you have a true calling for teaching.
Have you ever watched Kristina Kuzmic’s videos on YouTube? If not, check them out. They will make you giggle. she has the true gift of gab and I love to see it.

Have you ever watched this video? Oh my….love that these boys stood up for what was right!

This one I just had to share…It will make you laugh. As a 26 year veteran teacher, I laughed really hard at this video. Sarcasm at it’s best! If you want to watch the original “You Are The BBQ Sauce” video see my post link above.
Thanks, Renee for sharing your kids art with me. I am sure the Kuzmic family would be impressed to  know just how many families lives they are touching and making a difference with just that catch phrase of “You Are The BBQ Sauce!” – Enjoy, 1969
 
These were super fun to create with my classes and they were able to eat their subjects. Ha! You gotta love that added bonus. Cassie Stephens did a fabulous job on her video that she shared on YouTube. We watched it and then got to work on our own 3D hearts.
We used 12 x 18 white drawing paper, water color, baby oil, Qtips & oil pastels. Watch the video. It is great and will help to explain the details to your kiddos.
I got tickled at some of the words that the kids chose to write on their hearts.
Some didn’t want to write words and that was OK too!
Sax Liquid Watercolor in the bottles gave a rich feeling to the backgrounds.
Baby Oil was really cool in blending the oil pastels.
This lesson was a huge success for all involved.

Thanks for dropping by…And a huge thank you to Cassie for posting such a great video!
Cassie, if you are reading this…we are trying to get our act together and make a Soul Sister Road trip to Art Scouts this summer! to be continued…. 1969

2 weeks ago I was walking down the hallway at Maclay School and I passed these portraits of our past Presidents. I was very impressed with this particular lesson as a grid lesson is a tough one to teach. I was thrilled to see this being taught in our lower school because this will help these students have a deeper understanding of this process when they get to Middle and Upper School Art at Maclay. Way to go 5th grade teachers for introducing this lesson in Social Studies.
Mrs. Sweeney, Mrs. Sims and Mrs. Ferraro always have their students involved in hands on engaging lessons. I should know. You ask, why? Well, each morning I cut through the lower school building to get to my Middle School Art Room. Sometimes I make this journey with our US Art Teacher, Ms. Maurey and we find ourselves on many occasions discussing the art in the hallways of Lower School at Maclay!
Once I saw these, I knew I wanted to do a blog post on them. I asked and received permission from the teachers. Thanks, guys! They are just too good not to share with others to inspire them for future lessons.
Resources for how to make a grid drawing:
https://www.art-is-fun.com/grid-method/
http://www.wikihow.com/Scale-Drawings-Using-the-Grid-Method
http://www.drawfamousfaces.com/how-to-set-up-a-grid/
Where can you  purchase this lesson? Well, I found it on this link below at Teachers Pay Teachers.
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Presidential-Portraits-Art-Project-373415

Students create a 12×18 patriotic portrait using the grid technique. There are prepared source images for every president, name labels for the finished portraits, examples, viewfinder tools, and; templates to help with the designs. Recently updated with brand new illustrations of the presidents. 59 pages. PDF format.
 See a different approach to the subject matter on this link Presidents Mystery Grid Bundle.

www.outside-the-lines.com © Scott Cummins

Where to find other lessons and art blogs on this, see below and click the links:
http://www.jennyknappenberger.com/presidents-day/
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Mystery-Grid-Drawing-Collection-American-Presidents-1239686
http://eshelmanartcca.blogspot.com/2011/02/presidential-portraits.html
http://www.inside-the-lines.com/?p=581
How to set up a successful grid drawing can be found at the link below:
http://www.theartofed.com/2013/02/08/grid-drawing-made-easy/
Other Presidential art lessons from Art Blogs:
http://candiceashmentart.blogspot.com/2012/04/reduce-reuse-recycle-newspaper-abe.html
http://doartimagineexplorecreate.blogspot.com/2011/04/andy-warhol-meets-george-washington.html
http://rollercoasterart.blogspot.com/
My personal favorite funky portraits of our Presidents:
https://www.penleyartco.com/collections/giclees
http://revolverwarholgallery.com/portfolio/jimmy-carter-150/
https://www.artbrokerage.com/Peter-Max/JFK-John-F-Kennedy-1989-89109
Nothing like a Penley, Warhol or Max Presidential Portrait! I do believe Penley is my all time favorite.
 
If you need more details on how to explain the Grid Method see the Youtube clips below:

I am so blessed to work at a school where the Arts aren’t hidden and they are used in cross curricular project based lessons. Thanks 5th grade teachers for letting me share your student art! I think these are way super fabulous just like you guys…1969

 
Since I have been at Maclay I have blogged on Friday several times.
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/10/fabulously-fridafrida-kahlo-that-is.html 
On that post you can find all kinds of information about Frida.
 I showed the students a video clip of Frida and read her bio. We discussed her life. This brought up lots of conversation in the class. It is a great way to get incite on just where your kids are in dealing with different situations. Do they have empathy and sympathy? To sum up the differences between the most commonly used meanings of these two terms: sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another. This is one character trait that I am trying to really focus on with my students. Empathy and I have found a good avenue is through art history.
 How did we create these Frida’s?
12×18 white paper
Drew out a sketch of Frida with pencil
Colored in with oil pastel, markers and crayons
Name on back with class code
 http://www.mayagonzalez.com/blog/2013/08/9-interesting-frida-facts/
 9 Interesting Facts About Frida:
  1.  Frida Kahlo was born Magdalena Carmen Frieda Kahlo y Calderón. The name Frieda comes from the German word Friede, which means peace. She dropped the e from her name around 1935, and subsequently became known as Frida.
  2. Of her 143 paintings, 55 are self-portraits and 88 are not
    She underwent 35 operations as a result of the bus accident she had in her youth
  3. She frequently included the symbolic monkey. In Mexican mythology, monkeys are symbols of lust, but Kahlo portrayed them as tender and protective symbols.
  4. The Louvre bought one of her paintings, The Frame. This was the first work by a 20th century Mexican artist ever purchased by the internationally renowned museum.
  5. Frida Kahlo’s ‘Roots’ holds the auction record for a Latin American piece of art.
  6. The 1943 work sold for US$ 5.6 million in 2006.
  7. Diego was 20 years older than Frida.
  8. Frida was injured in a bus accident at age 15, she died at age 47.
  9. Frida lived 4 years in the United States, including time here in San Francisco, CA
 Each one turned out so super different.
 Love the details in the background.

 
Can I tell you how blessed I am that my school believes in Relevant Professional Development. This past month I was able to attend the NAEA Conference in NY. We had a smidge bit of down time and ran up to the MOMA to see this original Frida. This was the best professional development that I have ever attended.
 I thought this was clever. They had her portrait hanging beside a mirror. Yes, you can imagine my excitement to see this because the MOMA lets you take photos in most areas of the museum.
 So, you guessed it. 1965 and I had to do a digital selfie in the mirror. What a day and what an experience. I can’t wait to share with the other art teachers at Maclay all the information that I brought back with me from NY!

We have an awesome team of Visual Arts teachers at Maclay. We (Kyle, Cathy and Kaitlyn) have all worked together to restructure the Visual Arts Classes for Upper School. We are working to have a strong vertical alignment and horizontal alignment too. Kyle and Kaitlyn did a super job on the flyers for this! Check them out below. Wowzy….
Now, if I can just figure out how to get all of us to the NAEA Conference 2018 in Seattle…fingers crossed!

EEEEK! Super excited. Thanks for stopping by – 1969
Check out these Youtube clips below for even more information on Friday!

We are getting ready for our Celebration of the Arts at Maclay on 3/24/2017. Our featured artist study this year is Peter Max. Below is a link to our Celebration.
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/you-are-bbq-sauce.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/04/keith-haring-and-maclays-celebration-of.html

We have based these colorful portraits off of Peter Max. We have done lessons on him before in other blog post. See below:
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/01/peter-max-valentines-unit.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/11/5th-grade-free-styling-peter-max-flags.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/06/peter-max-maxed-out-at-end-of-year.html

For this lesson, we printed out a few photos of our Division Heads then cut them out and glued them down onto 12×18 colored construction paper. Had the kids embellish some details on the xerox copy but mainly focused on the blending of all of the color in the background. Can’t wait to get them in a slide show to share!

Many details of our event have been posted and shared. I will do a follow up post with our fun activities, schedule and booth names, but for now here is a taste of just what our Fine Art Department has going on as of right now.

I do like that we have a logo and a brand for our event. We will only change out the colors each year to update with our theme. Can’t wait to share more….

But for now, enjoy 1969

Kyle does a super job at teaching value to our upper school art classes. See these links below for other examples to this lesson.
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/03/maclays-us-art-with-kyle-maurey-value.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/02/value-painting-with-kyle-maurey-in.html
Here are links to other blogs that have taught value:
http://helloartsy.com/value-scale/
http://www.easy-drawing-lessons.com/value-drawing.html
http://www.teachkidsart.net/make-value-scale/
http://thevirtualinstructor.com/Value.html 
For more detailed directions on this particular lesson by Kyle Maurey please click the links at the start of this post for details and examples.
Value The lightness or darkness of tones or colors. White is the lightest value; black is the darkest. The value halfway between these extremes is called middle gray. Space An element of art by which positive and negative areas are defined or a sense of depth achieved in a work of art .
enjoy, 1969

Art Class got in on some of the action of teaching about bullying. We were asked to make signs that say, “You Are The BBQ Sauce.” We didn’t tell the kids why. Other teachers on campus hung them up. The kids were buzzing with ideas on what this concept meant. They were up for a week then all homeroom classes had a session on watching the video below.  This video clip lead to a dialogue on how you should treat people. This was a venue for discussing a myriad of issues that kids deal with in the bullying realm.


Follow up questions after the video were sent out by email. They are listed below. Thanks to Lance and Kathy for organizing this well worth it activity to promote awareness in our school.
 
4 Ways To Deal With A Bully
1)     What did you think of the video?
2)     What is the main takeaway from the video?
3)     How common is bullying here at Maclay?
4)     Does age make a difference?
5)     Are there differences in the bullying experience of girls and boys?
6)     Who do children tell when they are being bullied?
7)     Why don’t some children tell?
8)     What does it feel like to be bullied?
9)     What is the role of peers in bullying?
10)  Are some children more likely to bully than others?
Follow up questions for the video were sent out by Lance Ramer and Kathy Englebrecht for a post discussion during homeroom.This leaves the door open for kids to come to us for their advocate if a specific situation arises. 

I have worked in several schools and I must admit that my School Head is on POINT when dealing with these situations. She just has her finger on the pulse of our middle school students. So lucky to be working with her and learning her tricks of the trade to grow my personal awareness and be able to collaborate with my peer faculty members.

How did we make signs? We used extra time at the end of class and had kids that were in between lessons collaborate and work on them. We used donated mat board, markers, pencils, and crayons.
I took photos of a few and printed them on the copier for the BBQ Sauce Team to be able to hang them up in classrooms, around school and on lockers.

How do you tackle this subject in your classroom?
We would love for you to share. Please comment in the links below and let us here from you.
Do you collaborate with other classrooms on your campus? How do you all spread the word?
https://www.littlethings.com/comical-kid-gives-funny-but-effective-anti-bullying-tips/
Enjoy, 1969

UPDATED on 3/7/2017
4 Ways to Deal with a Bully – Summary of Responses 

1) What did you think of the video?
Good source of information
Helpful – interesting to watch
Different version of information
Lame one-liners
Different than what they expected
Good examples – shorter is more effective
Empowering
Now know what the signs meant

2) What is the main takeaway from the video?
You are the BBQ Sauce
Need to be nice to everyone, even if everyone doesn’t like you
4 ways to deal with a bully
Good metaphor
Relaxed – casual people talking about bullying
Bullies are bad
Stand up for people without being mean
We should not be complacent – need to help others

3) How common is bullying here at Maclay?
Relatively rare
Much better here than other places
Kids feel safe here
See it a lot – Happens Frequently (break & lunch)
More verbal bullying – “just joking” – sarcastic & shady
Not at all
Pretty common – teasing
No physical bullying
People are too sensitive
Most are benevolent, however some can be malevolent

4) Does age make a difference?
Going to theatre
HS @ lunch – MS @ drama
Yes & No – bullying should not take place
Some older kids think they have power over the younger kids
8th graders are being rude to 7th graders
Older kids think it’s cool to pick on younger folks
Younger kids won’t stand up to older kids
Worse in lower school

5) Are there differences in the bullying experience of girls and boys?
Girls talk behind your back and think that they are better than you
Boys make fun of each other
Girls are biggest bullies – gossip
Boys tease each other more, but get over it
Girls have more drama and are meaner
Girls over react with everything
Guys are more physical – Girls are verbal
Don’t think boys realize they’re bullying
Girls more sensitive
Getting cut from athletic teams can be hard because people talk about you

6) Who do children tell when they are being bullied?
Mom, Sister, Teachers
Tell their friends, especially girls
Boys would tell and adult if they thought someone’s life was in danger
Scared to tell & be labeled a snitch
Guidance – Mrs. Smith
Teachers they’ve known for a while
Parents or their Regent

7) Why don’t some children tell?
Scared
Easier to not get involved
Maybe they think if they tell the other person will bully them more
Become a bigger target/Make things worse
Afraid others won’t talk to them
Embarrassed
Scared
Bully would tell them not to tell. If they did they would not have friends and other students would give them a hard time.

8) What does it feel like to be bullied?
I don’t like being taken advantage of
It sucks
I haven’t been bullied – harassed (bullying is everyday & consistent…harassment is less frequent)
Bad/Saddening – feel like alone
Ruptures your soul, and it is quite abrupt

9) What is the role of peers in bullying?

Must standup/confront the bully

Depends on the type of bullying – Verbal v Physical

There’s a small group of people in each grade that would talk

Most people would just watch & not speak up

Depends on how bad the problem gets/context

Support the person being bullied – emotionally

10) Are some children more likely to bully than others?
Can’t be explained – jealousy
If you grow up a bully, you’ll continue to be one
Bullies come from unfortunate/uncomfortable lives and bad situations
Bullies are insecure & they need to bully to feel secure & not worry
Popular/Not Popular
Small school lends to less bullying because you know everyone