In the art lesson below, the night got dark really fast!  Oops, we added a little too much black!  Oh well, sometimes I let kids goof.  I have found that the kids seem to learn better when they see what their mistakes can cause.  Don’t we all?

Directions:

I gave the kids blue, white, and black paint.
I told them that I wanted white to gradually turn to light blue, medium blue, dark blue, and then eventually to black.
Once they got the layers of tints/shades of blue, they painted a winter scene.
Then, they splattered some white to represent the snow. 
Some of the paintings look like a snowstorm rather than a serene winter night.
Oh well.  Things sometimes turnout a little different than you plan.  Art teachers are very aware of the many surprises in store when doing art with kids.
Everybody lives and learns.

Perfect song for this post…The Bangles singing “Hazy Shades of Winter” with scenes from the movie, Less Than Zero with Robert Downey, Jr. and Andrew McCarthy (1987).

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While surfing the web, I ran across an artist named, Bart Vargas. The project below was adapted based on Bart Vargas work.
Who is Bart Vargas?  I found an amazing video with Bart giving a Tedx Talk.  Seriously, the video is an awesome way to introduce Bart Vargas to middle and high school students.
Have a look below at Bart Vargas Art and check out his website Bart Vargas.

Directions:

Students marked the 14″ x 14″ paper in one inch increments on all 4 sides of the paper.
Then, they drew each line to a center dot.
Students picked a stencil and centered the stencil in the middle of the paper.
Students traced the stencil onto the artwork using a light table.
Students made 10 shades of a color and painted sporadically on their art.
Students made 10 tints of a color and painted sporadically on their art.
For the remaining unpainted slots, the students could paint color(s) of their choice.
One of the last steps was painting the stencil in the middle of the art.
After all the paint was dry, the students used a sharpie to outline each painted slot.

Although the directions seemed complicated, they are really quite simple.  The students were able to review tints and shades.  Also, they were given lots of choices in developing their particular artwork.

Have a look at these cool results by my 7th Graders.

Bart, The Who asked the same question back on August 18, 1978.
“Who Are You”?”

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