We have posted on Hundertwasser in the past.  Click HERE for previous post. 
I wanted to do some landscapes and perspective drawing with my 8th graders.  After several days of thought, I came to the conclusion that I could do both on the same project. 
Directions:
We discussed perspective drawing and practiced for several days.
Then, I gave the basic landscape review.
The kids drew.
The kids painted with watercolor.
The kids outlined with a sharpie.

I really was impressed with the results.

There are a total of forty-four “I“s and eyes on this post. 
Here’s a song about Bette Davis’ Eyes by Kim Carnes.
1965
I found this idea here:
http://www.onceuponanartroom.com/2013/01/perspective-art-galleries.html
http://www.onceuponanartroom.com/search/label/One%20Point%20Perspective
http://www.onceuponanartroom.com/ 
Check out this Art Education Blog. It has some great ideas.
This site has great information to help students understand:
http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/one-point-perspective-drawing

Understand that:

  • Objects above the horizon line are drawn as if you are looking up at them (you see the bottom of the object)
  • Objects below the horizon line are drawn as if you are looking down at them (you see the top of the object)
  • Objects that are neither above nor below the horizon line are drawn as if you are looking directly at them (you see neither the top or the bottom of the object)

One point perspective: definition

Dictionary.com define one point perspective as:

“…a mathematical system for representing three-dimensional objects and space on a two-dimensional surface by means of intersecting lines that are drawn vertically and horizontally and that radiate from one point on a horizon line…”

Although this definition sounds complicated, the concept is relatively simple. One point perspective is a drawing method that shows how things appear to get smaller as they get further away, converging towards a single ‘vanishing point’ on the horizon line. It is a way of drawing objects upon a flat piece of paper (or other drawing surface) so that they look three-dimensional and realistic.

Drawing in one point perspective is usually appropriate when the subject is viewed ‘front-on’ (such as when looking directly at the face of a cube or the wall of building) or when looking directly down something long, like a road or railway track. It is popular drawing method with architects and illustrators, especially when drawing room interiors. To understand more about the history of perspective in art, please read our accompanying Guide to Linear Perspective – seriously, check out this site. It is so very helpful. http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/one-point-perspective-drawing

 
Supplies:
9 x 12 Paper
Markers
Colored Pencils
Rulers
Pencils
Erasers

 
I hope you all enjoyed. Thanks for stopping by…1969