I work in such a cool place. Did you know that? Maclay values the Arts on campus. This is evident by when you walk down the hallways and see really super artsy items hanging up on the bulletin boards or go into the classrooms to see pieces of art like these sunshines in the particular blog post. I tend to be on the 4th and 5th grade hallways a good bit as that is my route on campus to different destinations.
Mary Byrd and Peter Max’s Psychedelic Sunshines make my heart smile when I see units that tie together Arts Integration like this lesson. Lots of Elements of Art being taught in this lesson. The teachers on the hallway incorporated the theme for our Celebration of the Arts into their classroom lessons. These are some of the results. Pretty cool, right?
Here are some lessons on our blog that are tired and true with Peter Max!
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/01/peter-max-valentines-unit.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/11/5th-grade-free-styling-peter-max-flags.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/getting-ready-for-our-celebration-of.htmlhttp://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/06/peter-max-maxed-out-at-end-of-year.html
Some other way cool art lessons about Peter Max on other Art Blogs / Educational Resources:
http://paintbrushrocket.blogspot.com/2015/04/third-grade-peter-max-hearts.html
http://dolvinartknight.blogspot.com/2013/03/peter-max-style-perspective-landscapes.html
http://www.fabercastell.com/playing-and-learning/the-art-room/project-ideas
http://artjulz.blogspot.com/2014/05/lady-liberty-peter-max-andy-warhol.html 
http://linesandcolors.com/2007/09/10/peter-max/ 
https://www.parkwestgallery.com/artist/peter-max Here you will learn all about Max’s life:

Peter Max’s story begins in Germany where he was born in 1937. He and his family fled the Nazis in 1938 and moved to Shanghai, China, where they lived for the next ten years. Max was incredibly artistic from the moment he was born, enamored by color and constantly searching for ways to draw on everything (to the detriment of his mother). For Peter, color was paired with sound – an intense synesthesia. The ripple of crayons on a steamer trunk was the first memorable experience for the artist where he truly realized his love for sound and color. Today, there are few works by Max created in silence.

Early in his life, Max fell in love with three things: comic books, movies, and jazz – all uniquely American. In China, Max’s lessons were taught in English, so when he saw his first American movie after school at the cinema and picked up his first comic book, he was able to understand them. Max’s early love for comic books hugely affected his style. The foreshortening of lines, bold colors, and the heavy black outline of the characters stayed with him.

He and his family traveled through Tibet, southern Africa, India, Italy, and Israel, exposing the young Peter to more cultures and languages than many see in a lifetime. While in Tibet, Max was struck by the monks in meditation. They were carrying their walking sticks and chanting by the waterfall at sunset—an image that Max wouldn’t forget and one that often appears in his art.. Before he left China, the pillars of Max’s style had been constructed. His love for color, spirituality, graphic lines, and music formed the foundation on which he would create his future artwork.

In 1948, they moved again, this time to Haifa, Israel. Peter learned fluent Hebrew and began delving more seriously into his art. Becoming a distraction from his classes, his parents tried to structure his creativity by enrolling him in art lessons with a Viennese Expressionist after school. Professor Hünik enlightened Peter, changing the way he thought about color. He became the professor’s protégé for the next two years and began defining himself as a colorist. When he needed more assistance with his drafting, he turned to comic books, following their foreshortened lines and vivid style.

There was another book that heavily influenced his style, though, and it was less than conventional. One summer, Max began reading the encyclopedia, beginning with the letter “A”. He got no further than astronomy. He was enamored by the subject, so much that he begged his parents to study academically. They found a way for him to audit classes at Technion, a scientific university in Haifa, where he began his thirst for space. Later in life, this deep interest in the cosmos would turn into a spiritual quest as much as it was scientific.

Before moving to America, the Max family traveled to Paris for nine months in 1953 where Peter spent time studying at the Louvre. While Max had demonstrated his interest in sweeping color and lines, almost nearing abstraction, his interest at the Louvre was actually in works by the 19th century artist, Adolphe-William Bouguereau. His nearly photo-realistic paintings were inspirational to Max, who wanted to focus more on his draftsmanship. Bouguereau was his ideal mentor to allow him to further develop his technique, but Max soon learned that while he was capable of painting in such a naturalistic style, it took much more time and patience.

His family eventually settled in Brooklyn, where Max graduated high school then studied under the realist Frank J. Reilly at the Art Students League. He spent nearly all his time at the Art Students League, taking every class possible for the next five years. He learned drafting and anatomy from Reilly, finely honing the technique he once admired of Bouguereau. Max discovered, however, that by painting so photo-realistically, he was closing off his imagination, limiting his options. Pushing toward abstraction, color fielding, and many of the styles in vogue, Max eventually found a place as a “Neo-Fauvist” and a “Neo-Expressionist,” allowing his creative spirit to blossom.

In 1961, fresh out of school, Max started a graphic design studio with friends, finding almost overnight success in the design industry. Throughout the sixties, Max developed his signature “psychedelic” style (his ongoing fusion of eastern yogi philosophy, astronomy, comic books, studies in color, and music) expressed through posters, advertising, and his graphic works. The look he achieved was sought-after by companies across the country and agencies, magazines, and national publications placed Max at the center of the youth movement. The story behind his poster for the Central Park “Be In” on Easter of 1967 was even adapted for the Academy Award-winning director Milos Forman’s film, “Hair.” Max was at the center of a cultural revolution, magnified by his unique graphic style. He was featured on The Tonight Show and on the cover of LIFE Magazine. His posters were on the walls of every college dorm-room, and he had become an iconic artist and designer.

In 1968, while working on a film in Paris, Max met Swami Satchidananda. That moment was life-changing for the artist. Introducing him to yoga and a deeper understanding of Eastern spirituality, Max invited the swami to stay with him in the United States, helping him establish the Integral Yoga Institute, spreading the teachings of yoga throughout America’s youth. With more than 70 branches in each state today, plus 21 other nations, Max helped introduce yoga to a greater portion of the world, enlightening young and creative minds.

For most of the 1970s, Max shut down his graphic workshop. Intensely focused on his getting back to the paint, he took himself off the radar for almost 18 years, only spending time painting. Park West Gallery has enjoyed a relationship with Peter Max since the 1970s and is the artist’s largest and longest-running dealer in the world. Throughout the ‘70s, even while retreating somewhat from the spotlight, Max stayed busy, the subject of an exhibition at the De Young Museum in San Francisco called “The World of Peter Max.” He was also commissioned by the U.S. Post Office to make the first ever environmental 10 cent stamp, commemorating the 1974 World’s Fair in Spokane, Washington. In 1976, he worked with Lee Iacocca of Chrysler to save the Statue of Liberty, creating a series that generated enough funding to restore the desperately worn landmark.

His style changed during this 18 year retreat, adapting his technique to the paint rather than a graphic medium. His palette became softer and more diverse and his strokes became broader and more textured. Thematically, he began to develop new imagery, like The Dega Man, Zero Megalopolis, and The Umbrella Man. American icons, especially the Statue of Liberty, appeared over and over in his works and, by the time he returned to the public scene in the ‘80s, Max’s style has transformed into something dramatic and almost politically charged. He re-opened his studio, creating a 40,000 square foot space for administration, painting, production, and gallery tours, just across the street from Lincoln Center in Manhattan. From that point on, Peter Max has stayed in the public eye, using his art to express his creativity while raising awareness on environmental and humanitarian issues.

In his global causes, Max is a passionate environmentalist and defender of human and animal rights. He has done paintings and projects for Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. In 1994, Max created a “Peace Accord” painting for the White House to commemorate the historic signing.

Max has completed his fourth Grammy Award poster, redesigned NBC’s symbolic peacock, was appointed as the official artist for five Super Bowls, the World Cup USA, Woodstock, the U.S. Tennis Open, and the NHL all-star game. Recently, he created six poster images in response to the September 11th attacks. Proceeds from the sale of these works were donated to the September 11th, Twin Towers, and Survivors Relief Funds. In October 2002, Max created 356 portrait paintings of the firefighters who perished in the September 11th terrorist attacks. Each painting was presented to the surviving families of the firefighters at a ceremony at Madison Square Garden. Also in 2002, Harry N. Abrams, Inc. published a new hardcover book, “The Art of Peter Max,” written by Charles Riley III, Ph. D.

Today, Max has evolved from a visionary pop artist of the 1960s to a master of neo-expressionism. His vibrant and colorful works have become a lasting part of contemporary American culture.

Articles on the benefits of Arts Integration:
https://www.aaeteachers.org/index.php/blog/936-the-benefits-of-art-integration
https://www.edutopia.org/arts-music-curriculum-child-development
http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/how-integrating-arts-into-other-subjects-makes-learning-come-alive/
Resources for Arts Integration:
https://educationcloset.com/arts-integration-lessons/
http://www.nea.org/tools/lessons/Arts-Across-the-Curriculum-K-5.html
http://www.artsintegration.com/?gclid=CjwKEAjwq5LHBRCN0YLf9-GyywYSJAAhOw6my8DeDhcmpvjaX-A7yEPWyYrZIQW4V9dvNci2gjfHtxoCX-Lw_wcB
http://think360arts.org/for-educators/lesson-plans/
Mary Byrd is on a very creative hallway at Maclay. All of the teachers are really artsy and seem to just “get” projects that tie into their curriculum and our school environment. I always love walking down the hallway to check out their bulletin boards. Maybe they will allow me to post on the one that is going up now on Earth Day =)
So here is a SHOUT OUT to my artsy lower school teachers! I love that you allow your kiddos to get messy and learn about art in your classrooms within your curriculums! Thank you! And, to those of you dropping by to check out the blog…stay awhile! 1969

I just love the rich watercolor in the background. For full details on how to create this lesson see link below.

http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/how-to-draw-3d-valentine-hearts.html Have posted on this earlier this month. The lesson was such a success that I wanted to share all of the hearts that I could on the blog for everyone to see!

I hope you feel inspired by these hearts because I know I was =) 1969

 
These were super fun to create with my classes and they were able to eat their subjects. Ha! You gotta love that added bonus. Cassie Stephens did a fabulous job on her video that she shared on YouTube. We watched it and then got to work on our own 3D hearts.
We used 12 x 18 white drawing paper, water color, baby oil, Qtips & oil pastels. Watch the video. It is great and will help to explain the details to your kiddos.
I got tickled at some of the words that the kids chose to write on their hearts.
Some didn’t want to write words and that was OK too!
Sax Liquid Watercolor in the bottles gave a rich feeling to the backgrounds.
Baby Oil was really cool in blending the oil pastels.
This lesson was a huge success for all involved.

Thanks for dropping by…And a huge thank you to Cassie for posting such a great video!
Cassie, if you are reading this…we are trying to get our act together and make a Soul Sister Road trip to Art Scouts this summer! to be continued…. 1969

My middle school students did these trees right before Christmas break.  The project was easy and a great one to work out some tension before finals. 
Directions:
The kids painted paper.
The kids drew trees.
The kids wrote things about themselves on the trees.
They cut out the trees.
The kids glued the trees on the painted paper.
Then, they used oil pastels to “accessorize” their paintings!

I was thinking about tree songs and I remembered this oldie from 1973.  Yeah, I was about 8.  I remember loving the song.  Also, I recall lots of yellow ribbons being around trees in my hometown.  If you are going to a throwback dance party in the near future, you may be able to get some dance moves off the video.  🙂 
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Get those ideas crackin’ for Valentines! Here are some fun facts about Peter Max
http://www.famousbirthdays.com/people/peter-max.html
Supplies Needed:
12×18 Paper
Oil Pastels
Reference Sheets of Peter Max
A fabulous IMAGINATION!
Other resources on Peter Max:
https://www.artsy.net/artist/peter-max
http://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/peter-max-4062.php
http://petermax.com/
Other Art Lessons on Peter Max:
http://www.fabercastell.com/playing-and-learning/the-art-room/project-ideas
http://dolvinartknight.blogspot.com/2013/03/peter-max-style-perspective-landscapes.html
http://thetalkingwallsmurals.blogspot.com/2012/05/peter-max-artist-lesson-for-grades-3-6.html
http://arteducationfaculty.weebly.com/sample-lesson-peter-max-part-1.html
Hope you got some cool ideas from dropping by…1969

I just love these second grade owls.  Some of them made me “hoot and holler” out loud.  The project took 2 class periods. 
  
Directions:
The kids painted the background paper.
I cut out a stencil in the shape of an owl.
The kids sponged the owl stencil that I had cut out.
Then, they used spouncers to make snowflakes.
After the owl had dried, they put details on the owl with oil pastels.

“Who, Who,” said the owl.

Here’s The Who singing “Who Are You?”
1965
 
Happy Christmas Break! Yes, we all made it! This lesson was done when we were down to one day lessons before exams. Kids used markers, sharpies, watercolor, oil pastels, white paper. Kids just got real creative and gave each bird a personality that represented their feelings of that particular day on that art class. I think they are a hoot!
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Ever hear of Kimmy Cantrell?  For website, click HERE.  I found Kimmy Cantrell quite interesting because he is a cool artist from Georgia!  Kimmy realized in high school that he had the art thing going in him.  He went to Georgia State University and got a degree in business.  He worked 12 years in distribution management.  After that he ended up accepting a job in rural South Georgia and working there for 20 years.  Then, one day he decided to do clay again and the self taught artist has been making art ever since.  I really like Kimmy Cantrell’s story and his art.

Directions:
This was a middle school project.
I showed this awesome video with Kimmy Cantrell speaking.  Click here.
First, I made the kids sketch their fish and color with colored pencil.
Then, they began the process of using cardboard to make a fish.  I gave options, but told them that they were free to approach the project in their own way.
Most kids cut the cardboard.
They used hot glue guns to get the fish parts all connected.
Glue guns are great, but you really have to plan ahead and have lots of extension cords ready to connect the guns.
Then, they began using oil pastels to color the fish.
Most of the kids’ fish were close to their original rendering.
Check out these colorful fish!

In the video above, Kimmy talked about “breaking the code”.  I just loved that and thought he did a great job in explaining so people could understand why art is how art is.  I hear lots of people talking about Picasso, Pollock, Mondrian, and they say, “I could do that.”  Well, I try to explain this to people a lot.  You could do it, but you did not do it first.  The first are the ones that break the code.  Anyway, I could so relate to this concept.

Have a look at our fish-

The Allman Brothers Band is from Georgia, too.  They sang a song called “Ramblin’ Man”.  I feel like Kimmy Cantrell rambled a long time before he got back to his lifelong passion.  Don’t we all?
1965
 To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, I decided to hook up with our Spanish teachers and teach a little Art History with our students. Frida was our first choice. I am so glad we studied her because our portraits of her turned out really well.
 
Here are some of the links we used to learn about Frida:
http://www.pbs.org/weta/fridakahlo/today/ 
http://www.fridakahlo.org/
http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/portraits/frida_kahlo.htm
Other art teachers have taught lessons like this and you can browse their links and art lessons too:
http://www.mommymaestra.com/2011/07/frida-kahlo-lesson-plans-activities.html
http://www.artzdoodle.com/frida-kahlo-art-lesson/
http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/07/fall-in-love-with-frida-kahlo.html

 http://www.frida-kahlo-foundation.org/biography.html 
Frida’s Biography was found in the link above:

Frida Kahlo Biography

Childhood and family

Self Portrait With Necklace Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderon, as her name appears on her birth certificate was born on July 6, 1907 in the house of her parents, known as La Casa Azul (The Blue House), in Coyoacan. At the time, this was a small town on the outskirts of Mexico City.

Her father, Guillermo Kahlo (1872-1941), was born Carl Wilhelm Kahlo in Pforzheim, Germany. He was the son of the painter and goldsmith Jakob Heinrich Kahlo and Henriett E. Kaufmann.
Kahlo claimed her father was of Jewish and Hungarian ancestry, but a 2005 book on Guillermo Kahlo, Fridas Vater (Schirmer/Mosel, 2005), states that he was descended from a long line of German Lutherans.

Wilhelm Kahlo sailed to Mexico in 1891 at the age of nineteen and, upon his arrival, changed his German forename, Wilhelm, to its Spanish equivalent, ‘Guillermo’. During the late 1930s, in the face of rising Nazism in Germany, Frida acknowledged and asserted her German heritage by spelling her name, Frieda (an allusion to “Frieden”, which means “peace” in German).
Frida’s mother, Matilde Calderon y Gonzalez, was a devout Catholic of primarily indigenous, as well as Spanish descent. Frida’s parents were married shortly after the death of Guillermo’s first wife during the birth of her second child. Although their marriage was quite unhappy, Guillermo and Matilde had four daughters, with Frida being the third. She had two older half sisters. Frida once remarked that she grew up in a world surrounded by females. Throughout most of her life, however, Frida remained close to her father.

The Mexican Revolution began in 1910 when Kahlo was three years old. Later, however, Kahlo claimed that she was born in 1910 so people would directly associate her with the revolution. In her writings, she recalled that her mother would usher her and her sisters inside the house as gunfire echoed in the streets of her hometown, which was extremely poor at the time. Occasionally, men would leap over the walls into their backyard and sometimes her mother would prepare a meal for the hungry revolutionaries.

Kahlo contracted polio at age six, which left her right leg thinner than the left, which Kahlo disguised by wearing long skirts. It has been conjectured that she also suffered from spina bifida, a congenital disease that could have affected both spinal and leg development. As a girl, she participated in boxing and other sports. In 1922, Kahlo was enrolled in the Preparatoria, one of Mexico’s premier schools, where she was one of only thirty-five girls. Kahlo joined a gang at the school and fell in love with the leader, Alejandro Gomez Arias. During this period, Kahlo also witnessed violent armed struggles in the streets of Mexico City as the Mexican Revolution continued.

Career as painter

Self Portrait 1932

After the accident, Frida Kahlo turned her attention away from the study of medicine to begin a full-time painting career. The accident left her in a great deal of pain while she recovered in a full body cast; she painted to occupy her time during her temporary state of immobilization. Her self-portraits became a dominant part of her life when she was immobile for three months after her accident. Frida Kahlo once said, “I paint myself because I am often alone and I am the subject I know best”. Her mother had a special easel made for her so she could paint in bed, and her father lent her his box of oil paints and some brushes.

Drawing on personal experiences, including her marriage, her miscarriages, and her numerous operations, Kahlo’s works often are characterized by their stark portrayals of pain. Of her 143 paintings, 55 are self-portraits which often incorporate symbolic portrayals of physical and psychological wounds. She insisted, “I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality”.
Kahlo was deeply influenced by indigenous Mexican culture, which is apparent in her use of bright colors and dramatic symbolism. She frequently included the symbolic monkey. In Mexican mythology, monkeys are symbols of lust, yet Kahlo portrayed them as tender and protective symbols. Christian and Jewish themes are often depicted in her work. She combined elements of the classic religious Mexican tradition with surrealist renderings.

At the invitation of Andre Breton, she went to France in 1939 and was featured at an exhibition of her paintings in Paris. The Louvre bought one of her paintings, The Frame, which was displayed at the exhibit. This was the first work by a 20th century Mexican artist ever purchased by the internationally renowned museum.

Stormy marriage

Portrait Of Diego Rivera

As a young artist, Kahlo approached the famous Mexican painter, Diego Rivera, whose work she admired, asking him for advice about pursuing art as a career. He immediately recognized her talent and her unique expression as truly special and uniquely Mexican. He encouraged her development as an artist and soon began an intimate relationship with Frida. They were married in 1929, despite the disapproval of Frida’s mother. They often were referred to as The Elephant and the Dove, a nickname that originated when Kahlo’s father used it to express their extreme difference in size.

Their marriage often was tumultuous. Notoriously, both Kahlo and Rivera had fiery temperaments and both had numerous extramarital affairs. The openly bisexual Kahlo had affairs with both men (including Leon Trotsky) and women; Rivera knew of and tolerated her relationships with women, but her relationships with men made him jealous. For her part, Kahlo became outraged when she learned that Rivera had an affair with her younger sister, Cristina. The couple eventually divorced, but remarried in 1940. Their second marriage was as turbulent as the first. Their living quarters often were separate, although sometimes adjacent.

Later years

Active communist sympathizers, Kahlo and Rivera befriended Leon Trotsky as he sought political sanctuary from Joseph Stalin’s regime in the Soviet Union. Initially, Trotsky lived with Rivera and then at Kahlo’s home, where they reportedly had an affair. Trotsky and his wife then moved to another house in Coyoacan where, later, he was assassinated.

Death

Viva la Vida, 1954

A few days before Frida Kahlo died on July 13, 1954, she wrote in her diary: “I hope the exit is joyful – and I hope never to return – Frida”. The official cause of death was given as pulmonary embolism, although some suspected that she died from overdose that may or may not have been accidental. An autopsy was never performed. She had been very ill throughout the previous year and her right leg had been amputated at the knee, owing to gangrene. She also had a bout of bronchopneumonia near that time, which had left her quite frail.
Later, in his autobiography, Diego Rivera wrote that the day Kahlo died was the most tragic day of his life, adding that, too late, he had realized that the most wonderful part of his life had been his love for her.

A pre-Columbian urn holding her ashes is on display in her former home, La Casa Azul (The Blue House), in Coyoacan. Today it is a museum housing a number of her works of art and numerous relics from her personal life. (From Wikipedia)

https://learnodo-newtonic.com/frida-kahlo-facts Click link for 10 facts about Frida.
Have you ever taught Frida. I had a blast with this lesson. I hope you will too. Thanks for stopping by and checking out our Frida’s.
1969