Watercolor grids are awesome, but very hard for my 6th grade class.  I ran across this activity from A Faithful Attempt Click HERE to see post.  The post was super with great directions!  Thank you, A Faithful Attempt for an awesome project!
Okay, so here was my main problem.  I gave the kids a choice of what to draw.  I explained to the students that they needed to pick a fairly simple design.  I showed them my example.  I highly discouraged several very complicated drawings.  I had explained the many problems with a complicated drawing.  Some refused to take the easier route on this project.  They were heck, bent, and determined to make it work.  As you may surmise, most of the kids that chose the more complicated and detailed designs had more trouble completing the task.  I tell you, sometimes you just got to let them figure stuff out.  
The four below have good art sense.  They know their limitations and they are planners.  Wow, look how their art smarts worked in their favor.  LOVE!
Directions:
Day 1-Make a 1 inch by 1 inch grid on your sheet of paper; Measure the lines with a ruler in one direction.  Then measure out the lines with the ruler in the other direction.  You should have a nice straight grid.

Day 2-Draw a design on top- I encourage fairly simple shapes (or a shape) that filled the paper nicely.

Day 3 and Day 4-Do you want to use warm colors for the background or cool colors for the background?
Or
Do you want to use warm colors for the drawing or cool colors for the drawing?
*Hints:  Make sure you add lots of water when using watercolors.
Move around on the paper.  Do not work on squares side-by-side as you run the risk of colors bleeding into each other and making brown (yuck)

I heard this band, Kaleo, singing “Way Down We Go” while the kids were doing this project.  I kinda feel like the song sums up the feeling of some kids feelings while trying to push through and finish the project.  As I have said before, the devil is in the details.  Hey, watch out for the details!
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We have posted on Hundertwasser in the past.  Click HERE for previous post. 
I wanted to do some landscapes and perspective drawing with my 8th graders.  After several days of thought, I came to the conclusion that I could do both on the same project. 
Directions:
We discussed perspective drawing and practiced for several days.
Then, I gave the basic landscape review.
The kids drew.
The kids painted with watercolor.
The kids outlined with a sharpie.

I really was impressed with the results.

There are a total of forty-four “I“s and eyes on this post. 
Here’s a song about Bette Davis’ Eyes by Kim Carnes.
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Tripod Textured Slab Mugs were the right way to go with my 7th Graders.  Usually, the kids work really hard and have poor results.  I am not sure if the project that I choose is too complicated or maybe they have not touched clay enough.  I have had 3 years of art with these kids and feel like they have made great progress.  If you judge by these mugs and know their background, you would probably say that they have come a long way.  

So how did this project come to be?  I really wanted to use the slab roller with my 7th Graders.  I came across a video on Youtube by Karan Witham-Walsh.  She has a great Youtube channel Karan Witham-Walsh YouTube Channel.  Also, you can find Karan’s work on Etsy at Karan’s Etsy link.  I found Karan’s video How to Make a Tripod Slab Cup.

Directions:

The kids watched the How to Make a Tripod Slab Cup Video.
I rolled out the slabs.
I showed the entire video.
I gave the kids the slabs.
 I showed clips of the video again and again as we worked.
The kids began the process of making the cup.
I gave them the option of using texture on their clay cups Texture Stencil Examples.  The stencil were very forgiving on some of the less than perfect craftsmanship.
Once they got the cup made, we wrapped in Saran Wrap and put the cups on the shelf.

On the following day, we watched a video on how to make handles jescia hopper Youtube video on how to make handles.  Great video!  They made handles and attached them to the cups.  Oh yeah, we had mugs!

We let the mugs sit for a week.
Then, I fired the mugs.
We glazed.  
Some kids chose to drip glaze here and there.

I really like the results.
I like coffee.  I would definitely drink a cup of Joe from one of these mugs.  I was wondering where cup of Joe saying came from and googled to find these 3 possibilities.

Well, there are two popular theories about the origin of this phrase: One is in regards to Josephus Daniels, who was Secretary of the Navy. On the month of June, 1914, he banned all U.S. Navy ships from serving alcoholic beverages. The sailors weren’t too thrilled with the decision, because they had to resort to the next strongest drink on the list, which was coffee!Since Josephus Daniels was the one responsible for banning alcohol and “forced” everyone to make the switch to coffee, the sailors nicknamed the drink after him, thus it became “a cup of joe,” Joe being short for Josephus. That’s the theory anyways. 

However, a more plausible theory comes from Snopes, where it’s explained how the word “joe” can simply mean the average man. For example, perhaps you’ve heard someone say: “I’m just an average joe.” That means he’s just an every day, ordinary kind of guy. Therefore, a drink involving the word “joe” would show that the drink is for the common man, or the average person. (http://www.knowyourphrase.com/phrase-meanings/Cup-Of-Joe.html) 

There was a New York company named Martinson’s Coffee (Andy Warhol liked to paint the cans) owned by a man named Joe Martinson. The neighbourhood of the company would be saturated by the aroma of roasting coffee, and coffee therefore became known as ‘a cup of Joe’. (https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070224120839AAcoJtL) 

What else but “Cotton Eye Joe” by REDNEX?
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What a better way to experiment with paint than with peacock. This subject matter just lends itself to the medium of paint. I gave the kids free rein of paint and their color scheme.
I researched different places to expose my kiddos to painting techniques a few links are below:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Painting_techniques
https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-6-painting-techniques-that-don-t-involve-a-brush
Supplies:
12×18 White Paper
Watercolor
Tempera Paint
Acrylic Paint
Pencil
Markers

These video clips are helpful in explaining just how to create a peacock.

So, are you inspired? Go grab a paint brush and get busy 😉 1969
 
For this 7th Grade project, I had the kids combine the old with the new.  They were required to incorporated James Rizzi Art with Vincent Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”.  The project was quite involved, but I was very pleased with the results.  

Directions:

I talked a little about James Rizzi.  We have posted on him before click here James Rizzi Post.  Also, I showed a video on Rizzi Art.  Click here for James Rizzi Video
Then, I talked about  Vincent Van Gogh and Starry Night.  We have posted on Van Gogh many times.  Click here for previous Van Gogh posts.  I found a cool interactive video.  Click here for Van Gogh Interactive Video on Youtube by xldear23. 

I gave a refresher course on one point perspective.  

Then, I told the students to draw a city using one point perspective.
I told them to use James Rizzi Style buildings.
Also, they had to have a Day or Night Sky in the Vincent Van Gogh “Starry Night” style.

They drew with pencil, outlined with sharpie, painted with watercolor, and outlined with sharpie again.

Have a look at the results!
Yes, this was a C O M P L I C A T E D  project.  Here’s “Complicated” that was released by Avril Lavigne in 2002.

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