I work in such a cool place. Did you know that? Maclay values the Arts on campus. This is evident by when you walk down the hallways and see really super artsy items hanging up on the bulletin boards or go into the classrooms to see pieces of art like these sunshines in the particular blog post. I tend to be on the 4th and 5th grade hallways a good bit as that is my route on campus to different destinations.
Mary Byrd and Peter Max’s Psychedelic Sunshines make my heart smile when I see units that tie together Arts Integration like this lesson. Lots of Elements of Art being taught in this lesson. The teachers on the hallway incorporated the theme for our Celebration of the Arts into their classroom lessons. These are some of the results. Pretty cool, right?
Here are some lessons on our blog that are tired and true with Peter Max!
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/01/peter-max-valentines-unit.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/11/5th-grade-free-styling-peter-max-flags.html
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/getting-ready-for-our-celebration-of.htmlhttp://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/06/peter-max-maxed-out-at-end-of-year.html
Some other way cool art lessons about Peter Max on other Art Blogs / Educational Resources:
http://paintbrushrocket.blogspot.com/2015/04/third-grade-peter-max-hearts.html
http://dolvinartknight.blogspot.com/2013/03/peter-max-style-perspective-landscapes.html
http://www.fabercastell.com/playing-and-learning/the-art-room/project-ideas
http://artjulz.blogspot.com/2014/05/lady-liberty-peter-max-andy-warhol.html 
http://linesandcolors.com/2007/09/10/peter-max/ 
https://www.parkwestgallery.com/artist/peter-max Here you will learn all about Max’s life:

Peter Max’s story begins in Germany where he was born in 1937. He and his family fled the Nazis in 1938 and moved to Shanghai, China, where they lived for the next ten years. Max was incredibly artistic from the moment he was born, enamored by color and constantly searching for ways to draw on everything (to the detriment of his mother). For Peter, color was paired with sound – an intense synesthesia. The ripple of crayons on a steamer trunk was the first memorable experience for the artist where he truly realized his love for sound and color. Today, there are few works by Max created in silence.

Early in his life, Max fell in love with three things: comic books, movies, and jazz – all uniquely American. In China, Max’s lessons were taught in English, so when he saw his first American movie after school at the cinema and picked up his first comic book, he was able to understand them. Max’s early love for comic books hugely affected his style. The foreshortening of lines, bold colors, and the heavy black outline of the characters stayed with him.

He and his family traveled through Tibet, southern Africa, India, Italy, and Israel, exposing the young Peter to more cultures and languages than many see in a lifetime. While in Tibet, Max was struck by the monks in meditation. They were carrying their walking sticks and chanting by the waterfall at sunset—an image that Max wouldn’t forget and one that often appears in his art.. Before he left China, the pillars of Max’s style had been constructed. His love for color, spirituality, graphic lines, and music formed the foundation on which he would create his future artwork.

In 1948, they moved again, this time to Haifa, Israel. Peter learned fluent Hebrew and began delving more seriously into his art. Becoming a distraction from his classes, his parents tried to structure his creativity by enrolling him in art lessons with a Viennese Expressionist after school. Professor Hünik enlightened Peter, changing the way he thought about color. He became the professor’s protégé for the next two years and began defining himself as a colorist. When he needed more assistance with his drafting, he turned to comic books, following their foreshortened lines and vivid style.

There was another book that heavily influenced his style, though, and it was less than conventional. One summer, Max began reading the encyclopedia, beginning with the letter “A”. He got no further than astronomy. He was enamored by the subject, so much that he begged his parents to study academically. They found a way for him to audit classes at Technion, a scientific university in Haifa, where he began his thirst for space. Later in life, this deep interest in the cosmos would turn into a spiritual quest as much as it was scientific.

Before moving to America, the Max family traveled to Paris for nine months in 1953 where Peter spent time studying at the Louvre. While Max had demonstrated his interest in sweeping color and lines, almost nearing abstraction, his interest at the Louvre was actually in works by the 19th century artist, Adolphe-William Bouguereau. His nearly photo-realistic paintings were inspirational to Max, who wanted to focus more on his draftsmanship. Bouguereau was his ideal mentor to allow him to further develop his technique, but Max soon learned that while he was capable of painting in such a naturalistic style, it took much more time and patience.

His family eventually settled in Brooklyn, where Max graduated high school then studied under the realist Frank J. Reilly at the Art Students League. He spent nearly all his time at the Art Students League, taking every class possible for the next five years. He learned drafting and anatomy from Reilly, finely honing the technique he once admired of Bouguereau. Max discovered, however, that by painting so photo-realistically, he was closing off his imagination, limiting his options. Pushing toward abstraction, color fielding, and many of the styles in vogue, Max eventually found a place as a “Neo-Fauvist” and a “Neo-Expressionist,” allowing his creative spirit to blossom.

In 1961, fresh out of school, Max started a graphic design studio with friends, finding almost overnight success in the design industry. Throughout the sixties, Max developed his signature “psychedelic” style (his ongoing fusion of eastern yogi philosophy, astronomy, comic books, studies in color, and music) expressed through posters, advertising, and his graphic works. The look he achieved was sought-after by companies across the country and agencies, magazines, and national publications placed Max at the center of the youth movement. The story behind his poster for the Central Park “Be In” on Easter of 1967 was even adapted for the Academy Award-winning director Milos Forman’s film, “Hair.” Max was at the center of a cultural revolution, magnified by his unique graphic style. He was featured on The Tonight Show and on the cover of LIFE Magazine. His posters were on the walls of every college dorm-room, and he had become an iconic artist and designer.

In 1968, while working on a film in Paris, Max met Swami Satchidananda. That moment was life-changing for the artist. Introducing him to yoga and a deeper understanding of Eastern spirituality, Max invited the swami to stay with him in the United States, helping him establish the Integral Yoga Institute, spreading the teachings of yoga throughout America’s youth. With more than 70 branches in each state today, plus 21 other nations, Max helped introduce yoga to a greater portion of the world, enlightening young and creative minds.

For most of the 1970s, Max shut down his graphic workshop. Intensely focused on his getting back to the paint, he took himself off the radar for almost 18 years, only spending time painting. Park West Gallery has enjoyed a relationship with Peter Max since the 1970s and is the artist’s largest and longest-running dealer in the world. Throughout the ‘70s, even while retreating somewhat from the spotlight, Max stayed busy, the subject of an exhibition at the De Young Museum in San Francisco called “The World of Peter Max.” He was also commissioned by the U.S. Post Office to make the first ever environmental 10 cent stamp, commemorating the 1974 World’s Fair in Spokane, Washington. In 1976, he worked with Lee Iacocca of Chrysler to save the Statue of Liberty, creating a series that generated enough funding to restore the desperately worn landmark.

His style changed during this 18 year retreat, adapting his technique to the paint rather than a graphic medium. His palette became softer and more diverse and his strokes became broader and more textured. Thematically, he began to develop new imagery, like The Dega Man, Zero Megalopolis, and The Umbrella Man. American icons, especially the Statue of Liberty, appeared over and over in his works and, by the time he returned to the public scene in the ‘80s, Max’s style has transformed into something dramatic and almost politically charged. He re-opened his studio, creating a 40,000 square foot space for administration, painting, production, and gallery tours, just across the street from Lincoln Center in Manhattan. From that point on, Peter Max has stayed in the public eye, using his art to express his creativity while raising awareness on environmental and humanitarian issues.

In his global causes, Max is a passionate environmentalist and defender of human and animal rights. He has done paintings and projects for Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. In 1994, Max created a “Peace Accord” painting for the White House to commemorate the historic signing.

Max has completed his fourth Grammy Award poster, redesigned NBC’s symbolic peacock, was appointed as the official artist for five Super Bowls, the World Cup USA, Woodstock, the U.S. Tennis Open, and the NHL all-star game. Recently, he created six poster images in response to the September 11th attacks. Proceeds from the sale of these works were donated to the September 11th, Twin Towers, and Survivors Relief Funds. In October 2002, Max created 356 portrait paintings of the firefighters who perished in the September 11th terrorist attacks. Each painting was presented to the surviving families of the firefighters at a ceremony at Madison Square Garden. Also in 2002, Harry N. Abrams, Inc. published a new hardcover book, “The Art of Peter Max,” written by Charles Riley III, Ph. D.

Today, Max has evolved from a visionary pop artist of the 1960s to a master of neo-expressionism. His vibrant and colorful works have become a lasting part of contemporary American culture.

Articles on the benefits of Arts Integration:
https://www.aaeteachers.org/index.php/blog/936-the-benefits-of-art-integration
https://www.edutopia.org/arts-music-curriculum-child-development
http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/how-integrating-arts-into-other-subjects-makes-learning-come-alive/
Resources for Arts Integration:
https://educationcloset.com/arts-integration-lessons/
http://www.nea.org/tools/lessons/Arts-Across-the-Curriculum-K-5.html
http://www.artsintegration.com/?gclid=CjwKEAjwq5LHBRCN0YLf9-GyywYSJAAhOw6my8DeDhcmpvjaX-A7yEPWyYrZIQW4V9dvNci2gjfHtxoCX-Lw_wcB
http://think360arts.org/for-educators/lesson-plans/
Mary Byrd is on a very creative hallway at Maclay. All of the teachers are really artsy and seem to just “get” projects that tie into their curriculum and our school environment. I always love walking down the hallway to check out their bulletin boards. Maybe they will allow me to post on the one that is going up now on Earth Day =)
So here is a SHOUT OUT to my artsy lower school teachers! I love that you allow your kiddos to get messy and learn about art in your classrooms within your curriculums! Thank you! And, to those of you dropping by to check out the blog…stay awhile! 1969

STIK was a cool artist for my first graders to study.  I introduced STIK with lots of pictures of his work.  Then, I said, “Go!”  The kids took the project and ran!  I love the results!
For more information on STIK, see this post Click Here.
STIK is from England.  The Who are from England.  Here’s The Who.
1965






Stik

                      

                  

Stik started painting unofficial, socially conscious murals in his hometown of Hackney, East London in 2001. His simple stick figures wordlessly tell the story of his community and he frequently collaborates with hospitals, charities and homeless organizations. Working from his East London studio, these projects are largely self-funded and he now creates monumental artworks with communities across the world.

    

Directions:

PUT YOUR NAME ON BACK OF YOUR PAPER

  • ·    Draw with a pencil a stick figure similar to Stik, the artist’s stick figure
  • ·    No mouth, hands, or feet
  • ·    Use 12×18 Colored Construction Paper. Paint the “Stik” figure white like his work.
  • ·    Outline your stick figure when it dries with a BLACK oil pastel / paint or Marker. Yes, you can use hair dryer to dry quicker.
  • ·    Put on drying rack
  • ·    Clean up paint
  • I lead with this lesson on Street Art and follow up with a Graffiti lesson using our Character Education words
  • http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2016/08/character-education-and-graffiti.html


Stencil Revolution » Artists » Stik Street Artist Biography

Stik Street Artist Biography

http://www.stencilrevolution.com/profiles/stik

“It’s the only thing in my life that I feel this strongly about.”

Stik makes for an odd figure in the world of street art. He creates cunningly simple lines and shapes that echo the nave drawings of children the world over. Yet the work is deceptively frank in appearance and meaning.

The artist’s painted community of stick men, women and children reside throughout London’s streetscape. Each location is carefully considered, and many are regularly revisited and maintained. These seemingly lost and forlorn figures could reflect Stik himself and his experience of homelessness. Perhaps it’s his way of making sure these characters have a home. He has stated, “My pieces are about moving through the cityscape and feeling insecure.”

The great unknown

What is known of Stik’s life would fill a very small piece of a very small wall. The English street artist was born in the mid-1980s. He claims to have always drawn, and that he found graffiti a natural evolution of his creativity. With no formal art education, he learned from other street artists, in particular Doze, Roa, Run and Zomby. Sightings of his signature stick figures in London began in 2002.

He maintains an anonymous persona, shielding his real self behind his image as a quiet and unassuming artist. There is, however, one biographical reference he emphasizes, and that is his period of homelessness. It’s a subject that his words often revisit, a theme that exists beneath the surface of his paintings.

Stik became homeless some time around the year 2000, the circumstances of which remain unexplained. He endured destitution for a period lasting approximately 10 years. He regularly relied on the generosity of friends for a place to stay, sofa-jumping day by day, but he also spent many nights in abandoned buildings. Stik lived through a lot of violence on the streets, and he recalls many times when he felt his life was in danger and he expected to die.

The winter of 2009 proved a turning point for Stik when a drop-in center helped him relocate to St. Mungo’s hostel in Hackney. His life at St. Mungo’s turned into a productive period for his street work. He acknowledges that the pursuit of art gave him the purpose and focus that pulled him of out homelessness.

Stik has kept a low profile as his recognition has increased, both for himself and his work (fans include Elton John, Bono and the Duke of Kent). He volunteers his time to art workshops and often gives back through donations of his work and time.

The artist originally used the name in reference to his drawn characters until people started to call him by it. After a while, the tag just seemed to “stick.”

The art of street art

“Art is free unless you’re selling it.”

Stik’s approach to public spaces is careful and considered. His view is to fit in with the immediate architecture and location, and he’ll never bomb a street or community ” he professes no interest in owning a street. Part of his work ethic includes returning to every painting as often as he can in order to clean it up from dirt and tagging. On more than one occasion, he’s said that he spends more time cleaning graffiti from his graffiti than he does making graffiti.

Stik’s beliefs concerning the nature of graffiti and art reflect a traditional, romantic ideology of the street. “Artistic statements should be free from censorship,” he says. “Sometimes you have to justify a price tag, but you shouldn’t have to justify art itself.”

Stik hasn’t exactly termed contemporary advertising a plague, but he’s by no means a fan. It’s a multi-faceted issue for him, revolving around ideas of art and commercialism. He considers it a matter of rights, a matter of who owns the streets. Balled up in the midst of the debate, he thinks graffiti is essential to urban life. He has talked about graffiti being less about breaking laws and more about changing laws.

“Street art is really an important medium because it’s completely uncensored. It’s an environmental medium. Actually, you are using your environment. You are using the city as your medium. The street art scene is dialogue. It’s more than dialogue; it’s a whole forum for a discussion. And it has feedback. It’s the blueprint that social networking was based on ” writing on your wall.”

About those stick figures

“I’ve been drawing these characters forever.”

Stik quietly confronts his audience with the most unassuming imagery possible. The heads are round. The eyes are dots. Bodies are rectangles and simple lines become arms, hands and legs. An arc here, a lean there, a chosen curve of a line ” this is all he relies upon to convey emotion. “Body language is really like a direct language,” Stik observes. “Transitioning that to lines on a page or on a wall strikes directly to your heart.”

But they’re not merely stick figures. As Stik explains, his characters become a type of emotional shorthand to reflect how he feels. They’re silent and therefore have no mouths, and are meant only to observe. Part of Stik’s artistic principle is a conscious response to work that proclaims “look at me” ” he wants to create art that looks at back its audience.

Stik’s work appears at times so spare and bleak that its character and posture seems to convey a sense of questioning or longing, sometimes even despair. “A lot of my work is loaded with a kind of melancholy,” he admits, “but I do try to put a positive or a light bit of gravitas in it so people can actually relate to it and it feels like something human.”

Stik smiles whenever he talks about his graffiti pulling him out of his homeless nightmare. He’s obviously proud of his accomplishments, and at the same time humbled by the attention and his success. Nonetheless, one question commonly comes at him time and again: how long can you keep doing these characters?

“I think,” Stik grins widely, “there’s enough diversity in stick figures to keep me happy for another 10 years.”
Other Links About Stik:
https://blog.vandalog.com/2013/12/stiks-first-nyc-solo-exhibit-at-dorian-grey-gallery/ 
http://stik.org/ 
https://www.artsy.net/artist/stik 
https://www.forbes.com/sites/alinacohen/2016/06/03/meet-the-artist-behind-the-famous-stick-figures/#40b1c10d795b 
 
Thanks for dropping by…1969

I just love the rich watercolor in the background. For full details on how to create this lesson see link below.

http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/how-to-draw-3d-valentine-hearts.html Have posted on this earlier this month. The lesson was such a success that I wanted to share all of the hearts that I could on the blog for everyone to see!

I hope you feel inspired by these hearts because I know I was =) 1969

When you have a best teacher friend that follows your blog and gets inspired to do some of the ideas in her own classroom….ahhhh that is quite a good feeling! This was one of those post that my friend, Renee, chose to use as a tool in her classroom too. I think her kiddos did a great job. They thought Kristina Kuzmic’s video was on point! Crazy how something so simple can be that powerful.
My daughter had Renee as a 3rd grade teacher. She was just awesome. She had her pulse on many items in her classroom. The kids flourished in that environment. You see Renee is that teacher that is still teaching my daughter. They had a special connection and as we were applying to college and getting all of that jazz lined up…who was there to proof our college essay? Yes, Renee! (and, Jeff too)
2 weeks ago I wrote a post on this topic. I contacted Kristina via Facebook. She shared our post on her Facebook page. Do you know how many of you have visited that particular blog post? Guess… Well, as I am typing we are at 13,200! Yes, in a 2 week span. Can you believe that? Here is the link below:
http://2soulsisters.blogspot.com/2017/03/you-are-bbq-sauce.html 
I think with that much traffic coming our way on this blog that it must mean that their is a need to discuss topics like bullying, mean girls and character education. What do you think? Well, Renee does a great job on integrating art into all of her lessons. It is such a smooth transition that the kids don’t have any idea they are learning. They think they are having fun. Now, if you can pull that off in the classroom in this day in time you have a true calling for teaching.
Have you ever watched Kristina Kuzmic’s videos on YouTube? If not, check them out. They will make you giggle. she has the true gift of gab and I love to see it.

Have you ever watched this video? Oh my….love that these boys stood up for what was right!

This one I just had to share…It will make you laugh. As a 26 year veteran teacher, I laughed really hard at this video. Sarcasm at it’s best! If you want to watch the original “You Are The BBQ Sauce” video see my post link above.
Thanks, Renee for sharing your kids art with me. I am sure the Kuzmic family would be impressed to  know just how many families lives they are touching and making a difference with just that catch phrase of “You Are The BBQ Sauce!” – Enjoy, 1969
 
These were super fun to create with my classes and they were able to eat their subjects. Ha! You gotta love that added bonus. Cassie Stephens did a fabulous job on her video that she shared on YouTube. We watched it and then got to work on our own 3D hearts.
We used 12 x 18 white drawing paper, water color, baby oil, Qtips & oil pastels. Watch the video. It is great and will help to explain the details to your kiddos.
I got tickled at some of the words that the kids chose to write on their hearts.
Some didn’t want to write words and that was OK too!
Sax Liquid Watercolor in the bottles gave a rich feeling to the backgrounds.
Baby Oil was really cool in blending the oil pastels.
This lesson was a huge success for all involved.

Thanks for dropping by…And a huge thank you to Cassie for posting such a great video!
Cassie, if you are reading this…we are trying to get our act together and make a Soul Sister Road trip to Art Scouts this summer! to be continued…. 1969

Inevitably throughout the school year, we have candy in our art rooms. This was a wonderful lesson that Cassie Stephens shared. I used this as a one day lesson on a school day with a wonky class schedule. It worked out fabulous. The kids enjoyed it and all were successful.
This kiddo mastered the candy contour and moved on to people. Again, pushing the limits in the art room and working at your personal best pace.
Look at that shading!
Practice makes perfect.
Have you checked out YouTube for quick reference videos? if not, do so. It has a ton of resources for most any lesson
Thanks, Cassie Stephens for a a great tutorial for the kids to watch. Easy to follow.

So, come on and get your contour on….1969

This lesson was in between 2 big units. We needed a catch up day but still one that was packed with art learning material. I popped 2 bags of popcorn. Placed on a tray. Had kids grab a handful (they could eventually eat it if they wanted to)
We looked at the shapes of popcorn and drew what we saw. As we did this, we listened to music and just had a real chill kind of lesson. Lots of reference videos on this type of lesson on Youtube.
Lots of fun, 1969

I found a wonderful resource for this lesson here at
http://arteascuola.com/2013/09/exercises-in-shade-and-gradations-to-the-new-folders/
Check it out. It has all the details. This is a great classroom lesson or could easily be incorporated into a sub lesson.
Good Luck!
Thanks for stopping by, 1969
I ran across this website:
http://www.theimaginationbox.com/olympics-games-2016.html
Have you ever heard of The Imagination Box? If not, look up Diane Pagan on social media. She has some really cool ideas to share on her PLN.
 Teachers Pay Teachers
TES 
ETSY 
Pinterest 
Instagram 
Facebook 
Twitter 
I ran across this worksheet below and decided to do a mini lesson with my middle schoolers to see just what they would produce. The Toucans were a hoot! Loved them. Each one was very unique and had an individual personality. They used:
Drawing Paper 9×12
Sax Water Color – Liquid
Prang Watercolor
Sharpie
Markers
Salt
Oil Pastels
Crayons
*mixed media
Hope you too are Soaring into 2017 with our CrEaTiViTy!
1969